Resources on Biblical prophecy – The Antipas Chronicles

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Paderborner Dom Dreifaltigkeitskapelle Liborius

The Interpretation Was Prior To The Reformation

Christopher Wordsworth, D.D. on the pre-Protestant identification of the woman on the beast as papal Rome rather than pagan Rome…”

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St. John Evangelist Anglican Church Altar

NOTES ON RITUALISM

Charles Spurgeon:

“THE RITUAL COMMISSION has issued its report, and with it a vast appendix. From amid dustheaps almost as huge as those which Dickens has immortalized, we have, by dint of fiddling and using the sieve, extracted a few pieces of gold and silver, which we hope will pass for good metal and be as useful now as they were in the days long past…”

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Nuremberg chronicles - f 24v OUR WARFARE IS AGAINST THE ERRORS

Christopher Wordsworth:

“We flee Babylon, because we love Sion. And the aim of our warfare is not to destroy our adversaries, but to save their souls and ours…”

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About The Antipas Chronicles:

“…We are a husband and wife of the reformed persuasion dedicated to the study of God’s Word and its application to life in the 21st century.  Neither of us claims to be any sort of Bible teacher or leader in the faith but simply disciples of Christ trying to follow Him wherever He leads us…”

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Poster Girls for this world – Mother Teresa of Calcutta

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File:President Reagan presents Mother Teresa with the Medal of Freedom 1985.jpg

President Reagan presents Mother Teresa with the Medal of Freedom at a White House Ceremony, 20 June 1985. (Wiki)

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There are many places you can go to learn the facts of Teresa’s extraordinary life, from very different points of view. (Take the links below to recommended articles.) I’d like to use the time I have with you to share thoughts and feelings about her.

Teresa is a poster girl for the human ideals of humanitarianism and universalism. These are ‘isms’ that our world in its self-righteousness promotes and rewards. All kinds of people admire her and, because of her canonization on September 4, many Catholics can now feel justified in offering her a kind of worship by praying to her to intercede for them.

But while they may think that her comments about the Lord welcoming everyone – no matter what they believe – reflect the view of a loving and tolerant soul, her attitude and actions were sinful.  The order of sisters which she founded don’t attempt to convert those in their care but direct them to seek their own gods, whichever gods they are. To withhold the knowledge of God the Father and His Son Jesus Christ from anyone, especially the ill and dying, is very wrong. Obviously they don’t know Him or they couldn’t do this. But that was Teresa’s deliberate way. 

Her life is sad – she endured a lot of suffering because of her delusions. Like many mystics, she experienced a “dark night of the soul” – a sense of total abandonment by the Lord. I deeply pity her. 

“The experience of this dark night has been referenced by Christian mystics. Catholic mystic Saint John of the Cross is often cited as the source of this idea. Roman Catholics consider this a crisis on a journey toward union with God. One source says that Mother Teresa’s entire life was a such a ‘dark night.’ A Catholic web site describes her life as such.” 

Oswald Chambers: Personal Piety Combined With Flawed Theology

Bob DeWaay

A Pulitzer Prize, a Medal of Freedom, and canonization, bring temporary glory that can condemn.

Though my life is hidden – insignificant to the world, I wouldn’t change places with her because that would mean I couldn’t know the Saviour. To not know Jesus is unutterable loss.

Teresa believed we go to Jesus through His mother – the godly Jewish woman whom He saved from sin, a woman who spoke of His salvation which she gloried in. The Lord will not share His glory with anyone else, for who is worthy of the glory that belongs to Him?

She adored the consecrated bread, the host – this was her Jesus.

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Matthew 16

26 For what profit is it to a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul? Or what will a man give in exchange for his soul?

Romans 1

25 who exchanged the truth of God for the lie, and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator, who is blessed forever. Amen.

 1 John 2

21 I have not written to you because you do not know the truth, but because you know it, and that no lie is of the truth.

22 Who is a liar but he who denies that Jesus is the Christ? He is antichrist who denies the Father and the Son. 23 Whoever denies the Son does not have the Father either; he who acknowledges the Son has the Father also.

Isaiah 48

10 Behold, I have refined you, but not as silver;
I have tested you in the furnace of affliction.
11 For My own sake, for My own sake, I will do it;
For how should My name be profaned?
And I will not give My glory to another.
12 “Listen to Me, O Jacob,
And Israel, My called:
I am He, I am the First,
I am also the Last.

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Resources – updated

The Vatican prepares to declare Mother Teresa a “saint” – Tom, excatholic4christ

The Myth Of Mother Teresa – Tim Challies

Some hard truths about Mother Teresa – Elizabeth Prata

Mother Teresa—A Lost Soul? – Richard Bennett

 

Quote of the day – Dave Hunt

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It’s sad that political correctness seems to rule the day. When it comes to Islam, we must be politically correct; when it comes to Catholicism, we must be politically correct. Rather let someone go to hell than offend their feelings. There is something really sad out there, Tom. Christians don’t think—we don’t recognize that truth is truth. It is black and white; you can’t compromise, you don’t dialogue with God, you don’t re-negotiate with God. The Bible has made it very clear exactly what the gospel is. It’s a matter of justice. God is the one who makes the rules. He created this universe; He created us. We’re going to have to go His way, and Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life; no man comes to the Father but by me.” But these people think that’s too narrow minded.

Dave Hunt

Quoted in: Francis Chan Rebukes Mike Gendron?

Original source: More Sparks Between Catholics and Evangelicals

Found through: Francis Chan’s spiritual blindness

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Quote of the day (let’s start with Spurgeon, of course!)

Herrad von Landsberg Whore of Babylon 12th century

Herrad von Landsberg, Whore of Babylon, 12th century

“No peace with Rome” is the motto of reason as well as of religion.

From “The Religion of Rome,” C.H. Spurgeon, Sword and Trowel, January 1873

Source: spurgeon.org

A curiousity of history – Catholic Charlemagne’s view concerning the veneration of images

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Deuteronomy 4

9 Only take heed to thyself, and keep thy soul diligently, lest thou forget the things which thine eyes have seen, and lest they depart from thy heart all the days of thy life: but teach them thy sons, and thy sons’ sons; 10 specially the day that thou stoodest before the Lord thy God in Horeb, when the Lord said unto me, Gather me the people together, and I will make them hear my words, that they may learn to fear me all the days that they shall live upon the earth, and that they may teach their children. 11 And ye came near and stood under the mountain; and the mountain burned with fire unto the midst of heaven, with darkness, clouds, and thick darkness. 12 And the Lord spake unto you out of the midst of the fire: ye heard the voice of the words, but saw no similitude; only ye heard a voice. 13 And he declared unto you his covenant, which he commanded you to perform, even ten commandments; and he wrote them upon two tables of stone.

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The Pilgrim Church (Hardcover)

The Pilgrim Church by E.H. Broadbent is helpful in getting an overview of the history of Christianity, especially the history of Bible Christians, from the days of the apostles to the early 20th century. 

In it I learned something that surprised me about Charlemagne, that his view concerning images was opposed to that which Romanism held then and holds today (Nicaean CouncilsTrent, the Council of (Concilium Tridentinunm); Catechism of the Catholic Church).

In learning and trying to write about this, I’ve waded out into waters over my head, however, though the history is complex, I think it’s fair to draw conclusions from the basic elements I know. 

Emperor Charlemagne called and presided at the Council of Frankfurt, which not only addressed the adoptionist heresy but responded to the acts of the Second Council of Nicea, which upheld the veneration of images. The issue of making and venerating images was extremely contentious back then, even violent. I wish that we too would be concerned about it, but in a peaceful, respectful manner.

Selected timeline:

754 – The Iconoclast Council rules against the veneration of images, and many images are destroyed. (Sometimes this council is referred to derisively as “The Mock Synod of Constantinople.”) (Please note that this link takes you to Jesuit Fordham University.)

787 (786) – The Second Council of Nicea reinstates veneration and anathematizes the Iconoclast Council.

790 – The Caroline Books are written; in them the veneration  of images is shown to be unBiblical.

792 – Charlemagne forwards materials on the Second Council of Nicea to Offa, king of the Mercians in Britain.

794 – The Council of Frankfurt opposes veneration of images but retains their use for instruction and adornment.

800 – Charlemagne is crowned emperor. Under his leadership the Carolingian Renaissance of learning continues.

Opposition to the veneration of images remains in Francia and Britain for an extended period.

Seeing that the Council Frankfurt rejected the veneration of images, while retaining their use for instruction and adornment, it is fair to say that Charlemagne’s view of images was closer to that of many evangelicals today than it is to that of Catholics of his own day and ours.

What is your view? Evangelical, Catholic, Biblical? Guess my own view is showing…

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Charlemagne instructing his son, Louis the PiousThe COUNCIL of FRANKFURT AD 794 (from The Pilgrim Church)

“The question of images had an important place in the Council called and presided over by Charlemagne at Frankfurt (794).3  Both civil and ecclesiastical rulers were present, so that it legislated on all matters. The pope sent his representatives. The decisions of the Second Council of Nicea, which had established the service and adoration of the images, were set aside, though they had been confirmed by the pope and accepted in the East. In their zeal for images, those who favored their use went so far as to call their opponents not only iconoclasts but also ‘Mohammedans.’ Nevertheless it was laid down in Frankfurt that all worship of images was to be rejected; there was to be no adoration, worship, reverence, veneration of them; no kneeling, burning of lights or offering of incense before them, nor any kissing of lifeless images, even though representing the Virgin and the Child. But images might be allowed in churches as ornaments and as memorials of pious men and pious deeds.

“Also the teaching that God can only be worshiped in the three lanagues – Latin, Greek, and Hebrew – was controverted, and it was affirmed that ‘there is no tongue in which prayer may not be offered.’ The representatives of the pope [Adrian I] were not then in a position to protest. The general feeling of the Franks, in their wars against, and missions to, the heathen Saxons was not favorable to idolatry.

“Louis, the third son of Charlemagne, who was at that time King of Aquitaine, succeeded his father as Emperor (AD 813). He was an admirer of a Spaniard named Claudius, a diligent student of the Scriptures, who had become renowned for his Commentaries on the Bible. As soon as he became Emperor, Louis appointed Claudius Bishop of Turin. The new bishop, with his knowledge and love of Scripture, took immediate advantage of the favorable circumstances created by the Council of Frankfurt, going even beyond its decrees in removing from the churches of Turin all images, which he called idols, not excepting the crosses. So many approved that no effective resistance could be made in Turin. Claudius also taught publicly that the apostolic office of St. Peter ceased with his life, that ‘the power of the keys’ passed to the whole episcopal order, and that the Bishop of Rome had apostolic power only so far as he led an apostolic life. There were naturally many who opposed this. Prominent among them was the abbot of a monastery near Nimes (look up for diacritical marks), yet even he admitted that most of the Transalpine prelates agreed with the Bishop of Turin.”

3. Latin Christianity, Dean Milman, Vol. III.

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