Quote of the day – William Carey, missionary to India

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File:William Carey.jpg“In one period the grossest ignorance and barbarism prevailed in the world; and afterwards, in a more enlightened age, the most daring infidelity, and contempt of God; so that the world which was once over-run with ignorance, now by wisdom knew not God, but changed the glory of the incorruptible God as much as in the most barbarous ages, into an image made like to corruptible man, and to birds, and four-footed beasts, and creeping things. Nay, as they increased in science and politeness, they ran into more abundant and extravagant idolatries.”

William Carey

An Enquiry into the Obligations of Christians to Use Means for the Conversion of the Heathens (1792)

HT: Wikiquotes

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What Kind of “Reformation” Does Pope Francis Have in Mind?

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Vatican Files

Evangelical Theological Perspectives on Roman Catholicism

As the Pope commemorates the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, what he has in mind is an altogether different kind of reformation, i.e. a reformation that will make his church more catholic and more Roman, doubtfully more evangelical.

LEONARDO DE CHIRICO

What Kind of “Reformation” Does Pope Francis Have in Mind?


Leonardo De Chirico (1967) planted and pastored a Reformed Baptist church in Ferrara (northern Italy) from 1997 to 2009. Since 2009 he has been involved in a church planting project in Rome and is now pastor of the church Breccia di Roma…
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The Bible – Inspired, whatever the language!

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A Bible study

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Revelation 5:8-10

Now when He had taken the scroll, the four living creatures and the twenty-four elders fell down before the Lamb, each having a harp, and golden bowls full of incense, which are the prayers of the saints. And they sang a new song, saying:

“You are worthy to take the scroll,
And to open its seals;
For You were slain,
And have redeemed us to God by Your blood
Out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation,
10 And have made us kings and priests to our God;
And we shall reign on the earth.”


Like many Catholic schoolgirls, I had to learn to speak and read at least a little French. Lately I’ve been trying to learn again, and even had the joy of reading short passages of the Word of God (La Parole de Dieu) in French. At Béréenne Attitude (Berean Attitude) in a post entitled “The Bible, a sacred book!” (La Bible, un livre sacré!), I found a link to the incredibly informative list about the Canon found below. 

In relearning what I’ve lost, there have been places to go for help. Here is an example of the simple kind of work I did to truly grasp Béréenne Attitude’s post. I’m grateful for the help of Google Translate, for one thing, which corrects or teaches me, as here, in how to correctly translate the title of the post:

<< La Bible, un livre sacré! >>

“The Bible, a sacred book!”

I didn’t have trouble grasping the simple French but I didn’t know if this should be translated ‘sacred’ or ‘holy’. What fun, but serious (sérieuse) too!

Here is a quote from this post in which the link was found. It states what we always affirm with joy, that the Bible that has come to us is worthy of all trust:

<< Ces listes englobent toutes à peu près les mêmes livres. >>

“These lists include nearly all the same books.”

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Ancient Canon Lists


“These are the fountains
of salvation, that he who
thirsts may be satisfied
with the living words
they contain. In these
alone the teaching of
godliness is proclaimed.
Let no one add to these;
let nothing be taken
away from them. For
concerning these the
Lord put to shame the
Sadducees, and said, Ye
do err, not knowing the
Scriptures.”

Athanasius

  1. The Muratorian Fragment (c. 170).
  2. Melito (c. 170).
  3. Origen (c. 240).
  4. Eusebius of Caesarea (c. 324).
  5. Cyril of Jerusalem (c. 350).
  6. Hilary of Poitiers (c. 360).
  7. The Cheltenham List (c. 360).
  8. Council of Laodicea (c. 363).
  9. Letter of Athanasius (367).
  10. Gregory of Nazianzus (c. 380).
  11. Amphilocius of Iconium (c. 380).
  12. The “Apostolic Canons” (c. 380).
  13. Epiphanius (c. 385).
  14. Jerome (c. 390).
  15. Augustine (c. 397).
  16. Third Council of Carthage (397).
  17. Rufinus of Aquileia (c. 400).
  18. Codex Claromontanus (c. 400).
  19. Letter of Innocent I (405).
  20. Decree of Gelasius (c. 550).
  21. Synopsis Scripturae Sacrae (c. 550).
  22. John of Damascus (c. 730).
  23. Others

SOURCE: Bible Research | Internet Resources for Students of Scripture