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A watchman urges us to speak in love


In closing I want to say that whatever your calling is in the Body of Christ I pray that you would take what is written in this tract to heart, and speak out at a time when it is not popular to do so. Those who have done so have reaped a harvest of souls for the Kingdom of God.

“I encourage you to do this especially if you are a pastor, evangelist, or in any position of leadership and have the God given opportunity to reach many. Speak not only to the Catholic people who are lost and need to hear the true gospel, but speak also on their behalf, speak for them who cannot speak for themselves. Tell your congregation that Roman Catholics need to be evangelized, and then teach your congregation how to evangelize the Roman Catholics.”

Proverbs 31:8,9

Open thy mouth for the dumb in the cause of all such as are appointed to destruction. Open thy mouth, judge righteously, and plead the cause of the poor and needy.

Ezekiel 3:17-18

Son of man, I have made thee a watchman unto the house of Israel: therefore hear the word at my mouth, and give them warning from me. When I say unto the wicked, Thou shalt surely die; and thou givest him not warning, nor speakest to warn the wicked from his wicked way, to save his life; the same wicked man shall die in his iniquity; but his blood will I require at thine hand.


HT: Sherry, BEHIND CLOSED DOORS

HT: Beth, “The Jesus of the Roman Catholic Church is not the Jesus proclaimed in God’s Word but rather, as Paul said, another Jesus.”

 


 

Who said this? William Ames!


Ephesians 5:13,14

13 But all things that are exposed are made manifest by the light, for whatever makes manifest is light. 14 Therefore He says:

“Awake, you who sleep,
Arise from the dead,
And Christ will give you light.”


So who is William Ames? – For me, he is someone new, but he was an important English Puritan theologian who lived in the Netherlands. I agree with his view of manmade holy days and was struck by his quote of Martin Bucer, the Strasbourg Reformer. Solid!


Dr William Ames (1576–1633)

One of Ames’s sermons became historical in the Puritan controversies. It was delivered in the university Church of St Mary the Great, Cambridge on 21 December 1609, and in it he rebuked sharply ‘lusory lotts’ and the ‘heathenish debauchery’ of the students during the Twelve Days of Christmas. ~ Wikipedia

[To adopt a lusory attitude is to accept the arbitrary rules of a game in order to facilitate the resulting experience of play. ~ Wikipedia]


excerpt:

Christmas: An Historical Survey Regarding Its Origins and Opposition to It

by Kevin Reed

William Ames (1576-1633), the prominent English Puritan who lived on the Continent among the Dutch for many years, sums up several fundamental principles relating to proper worship:

“No instituted worship is lawful unless God is its author and ordainer.  Deuteronomy 4:1-2; 12:32.”

“The most solemn time for worship is now the first day of each week, called the Lord’s Day, Revelation 1:10; 1 Corinthians 16:2.”

“Opposed to the ordinance of the Lord’s Day are all feast days ordained by men when they are considered holy days like the Lord’s Day.”

Shortly before his death, Ames prepared a massive volume, A Fresh Suit Against Human Ceremonies in God’s Worship (1633). This book was written as a response to earlier publications by John Morton and John Burgess. Throughout his work, Ames provides a detailed rebuttal of many of the Episcopal arguments related to church polity.

In one place, Ames speaks of the scriptural law of worship. Referring to Leviticus 10:1, he states:

“The sons of Aaron are there condemned for bringing strange, or ordinary fire to God’s worship; as doing that which God had not commanded, and yet had not otherwise forbidden, than by providing fire proper to his worship, and not appointing any other to be used in the tabernacle. And this is the very plea which we make against ceremonies of human institution, in God’s worship.”

Then he notes Jeremiah 7:31, and comments:

“Seeing God under this title only condemns that which the Jews did because he had not commanded it [to] them; therefore no other reason need to be sought for the confutation of superstitions, than that they are not by commandment from God.”

In a separate section “Concerning the Lord’s Day, Temples, and Ceremonial Festivals,” Ames states:

“Concerning ceremonial festivals, of man’s making, our practice cannot be objected; because we observe none.”

“Martin Bucer” by Jean-Jacques Boissard

In support of his position he [Ames] cites several prominent Protestant writers, including the remarks of Bucer on Matthew 12:
s
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I would to God that every holy day whatsoever besides the Lord’s day were abolished. That zeal which brought them first in, was without all warrant of the word, and merely followed corrupt reason, forsooth to drive out the holy days of the pagans, as one nail drives out another. Those holy days have been so tainted with superstitions that I wonder we tremble not at their very names.

 

 

Who said this?


Die Reformatoren Heinrich Bullinger, Girolamo Zanchi, John Knox, Huldrych Zwingli, Martir (?), Martin Bucer, Matthew Parker, William Perkins, Philipp Melanchthon, Martin Luther, Jean Calvin, Theodore de Bèze (Beza) und John Wyclif um einen Tisch sitzend, Öl auf Leinwand, 87 x 142 cm, deutsche Schule des frühen 17. Jahrhunderts.


“I know how difficult it is to persuade the world that God disapproves of all modes of worship not expressly sanctioned by His Word.

“The opposite persuasion which cleaves to them, being seated, as it were, in their very bones and marrow, is, that whatever they do has in itself a sufficient sanction, provided it exhibits some kind of zeal for the honor of God.

“But since God not only regards as frivolous, but also plainly abominates, whatever we undertake from zeal to His worship, if at variance with His command, what do we gain by a contrary course?

“The words of God are clear and distinct,

Obedience is better than sacrifice.

1 Samuel 15:22

In vain do they worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men.

Matthew 15:9

“Every addition of His word, especially in this matter, is a lie. Mere ‘will worship’ (ethelothreeskia) is vanity [Colossians 2:23].

“This is the decision, and when once the judge has decided, it is no longer time to debate.”


Calvin, Tracts (1844; rpt. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1983), Vol. 1, pp. 128-29.


source:

Christmas: An Historical Survey Regarding Its Origins and Opposition to It, by Kevin Reed


 

One little Christian fish, swimming against the current, flashing in the sunlit waters!


Luke 9:52-56

NKJV

52 . . .And as they went, they entered a village of the Samaritans, to prepare for Him. 53 But they did not receive Him, because His face was set for the journey to Jerusalem. 54 And when His disciples James and John saw this, they said, “Lord, do You want us to command fire to come down from heaven and consume them, just as Elijah did?”

55 But He turned and rebuked them, and said, “You do not know what manner of spirit you are of. 56 For the Son of Man did not come to destroy men’s lives but to save them. And they went to another village.


 

 

Philipp I, Landgrave of Hesse
Source: Reformation Picture Gallery – People web site

Philipp was known as der Großmütige, 

Philip the Magnanimous!

I hope you will see that by the grace of God he truly was magnanimous! 

Philipp was Landgrave [Count] of Hesse, a region in Germany. When he was only five, his father died. Until 1518 he was under the regency of his mother Anna.

He introduced the Reformation into Hesse,

founded the University of Marburg,

and was one of the most zealous promoters of the Reformation in Germany.

In his attitude toward the Anabaptists he showed extraordinary generosity and kindness. He saw in their movement a disorder in religious life, which had its roots in error and weakness in the faith rather than in moral error like sedition and revolt, and which must therefore be treated with lenience and consideration.

He said,

“On every hand there is no perfect faith in us, so that we must say: Lord, I believe; help Thou mine unbelief.”

“Alas, how cold love is among us who call ourselves Christian and those who create such offense must give an account before God and bear a grievous judgment.”

Above all, he said, one must try to lead the Anabaptists back to the church by persuasion and indoctrination. His heartfelt policy was a matter of conscience. He would not agree to execute anyone for a matter of faith, where there was no other ground for taking his life. Otherwise no Catholics or Jews could be tolerated, he said, for they blasphemed Christ and they too would have to be put to death.

He declared in a letter of May 1533, that he had never yet had a man put to death solely on a matter of belief; he had merely banished such or commanded them to sell their goods and move out – only the obstinate who refused to go had he arrested. He could not persuade himself “to punish anyone with the sword because of an error of faith, which is a gift of God, and was adopted at the time, not from malice, but from ignorance.” 

When 18 Anabaptists were again seized in Hausbreitenbach and the Elector of Saxony demanded their execution, Philipp refused with the words, “Our Lord will give grace that they may be converted.” His hope was fulfilled in several instances.

After the fall of Münster and the capture and condemnation of the Anabaptist leaders, upon Philipp’s express wish an attempt was made to convert the leaders by the Protestant clergymen Antonius Corvinus and Johann Kymeus. His view was that,

“One should pray God to correct the errors in his own life and to admonish the Anabaptists kindly and in a friendly spirit. . .it is necessary to use caution and not make use of the sword until all other means have been tried.”

His policy included the abolition of vices in his realm because Anabaptists were offended by them. But they also included sharp punishment of foreign and local Anabaptists: beating, branding, and banishment. However, he wasn’t greedy of their confiscated goods but stipulated their return to the Anabaptists if they would depart his realm.

Philipp never confirmed a death sentence. In 1540 he was able to write that in his realm the death sentence had never been inflicted on an Anabaptist. In that day, Anabaptists were executed elsewhere and other German nobles tried to convince him to follow them in this. Instead he took pains to induce imprisoned Anabaptists to recant. He sent a letter in his own hand to those jailed at Wolkersdorf, chiding them but saying that he wanted to deal with them graciously and kindly, and was therefore sending them a God-fearing man who wanted to discuss with them in a friendly way their error and that they should listen to this person:

“. . .he shall show you the right way, so that you may come to the true knowledge of divine truth, which we would most heartily like to see and would rather hear than to proceed against you with rigor, as is our right, since you refuse to desist from your unchristian sect.”

To this end he called Martin Bucer, reformer of Strasbourg, to Hesse. This led to success. The Anabaptist Peter Tasch and his followers declared themselves willing to submit to the church. They presented their modified principles in the document:

Bekenntnis oder Antwort einiger Fragestücke oder Artikeln der gefangenen Täufer und anderer im Land zu Hessen vom 11. Dezember 1538  [Confession or answer of some questions or articles of the captive Baptists and others in the country of Hesse of December 11th 1538].

The statement was accepted by the Lutheran clergy. Eagerly Philipp accepted the proposal of Bucer to have these converts win their own brethren. He did not hesitate to deal with Anabaptists in person, and to his great joy most of them within his realm returned to the established church.

Writing to Johann Friederich in 1545, Philipp gave his general reasons for the policy, citing Matthew 13:24-30; Luke 9:52-56; Romans 14:1-5; and Romans 12 ff. He wrote,

“These quotations block our path to such an extent that we cannot find it in our conscience to proceed with such rigor against a person who errs somewhat in the faith; for the person might accept instruction over night and desist from his error. Now if such a one should straightway be put to death by one of us, we are truly concerned that we may not be innocent of his blood. . .Therefore it pleased us once more, wherever these people are, that they be arrested and indoctrinated by skilled persons with the Word of God; and those who would not return to the church and desist from their error after being instructed should be expelled from the country; if they returned or if they were so completely obstinate that they might infect others they should be kept in prison.”

This letter provides evidence of a generous mind and noble religious tolerance, in which he far surpassed his contemporaries and the reformers Martin Luther and Philip Melanchthon. He represented a new era, while they were still in the clutches of the Middle Ages. He maintained this position even during his imprisonment by Charles V after the Schmalkaldian War. In 1559, in an opinion to Johann Friedrich of Saxony, he says,

“It is so, many Anabaptists have an unchristian evil sect, as was shown at Münster and elsewhere; but they are not alike. Some are simple, pious folk; they should be dealt with in moderation. Anabaptists who deal with the sword may rightly also be punished with the sword. But those who err in faith should be dealt with leniently, and shall be instructed in accord with the principle of love to one’s neighbor, and no effort shall be spared, also they shall be heard, and if they will not accept the truth and scatter error like a harmful seed among Christians, they shall be expelled and their preaching abolished. But to punish them with death, as happens in some countries, when they have done nothing more than err in faith and have not acted seditiously, cannot be reconciled with the Gospel. Other Christian teachers like Augustine and Chrysostom also violently opposed it.”

Philipp also impressed his attitude upon his sons in his will:

“To kill people for the reason that they believed an error we have never done, and wish to admonish our sons not to do so, for we consider that it is contrary to God, as is clearly shown in the Gospel.”

Philipp’s sons and descendants held to this attitude. His spirit of gentleness and reconciliation lived on among them. 

In spite of his zeal in promoting the Reformation, Philipp’s personal life was marred by a licentious lifestyle and a bigamous marriage. In 1523, Philipp married Christine of Saxony and they had 10 children; then, in 1540 he married Margarethe von der Saale with whom he had 9. He argued with various Reformation leaders that because Scripture allowed men such as the Old Testament patriarchs to have more than one wife, he was therefore entitled to have two marriages. This situation led to a weakening of his relationships with other German Protestant princes.


Extracted from:

Neff, Christian and Richard D. Thiessen. “Philipp I, Landgrave of Hesse (1504-1567).” Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. April 2007. Web. 7 Nov 2017.

Please go there for detailed citations.


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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, pp. 163-166. All rights reserved.

©1996-2017 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.


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