Mary of Nazareth, who is she really? A few thoughts, part 2



1 Timothy 2:5,6

For there is one God, and one mediator also between God and men, the man Christ Jesus, who gave Himself as a ransom for all, the testimony given at the proper time.

Hebrews 12

18 For you have not come to a mountain that can be touched and to a blazing fire, and to darkness and gloom and whirlwind, 19 and to the blast of a trumpet and the sound of words which sound was such that those who heard begged that no further word be spoken to them. 20 For they could not bear the command, “If even a beast touches the mountain, it will be stoned.” 21 And so terrible was the sight, that Moses said, “I am full of fear and trembling.” 22 But you have come to Mount Zion and to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to myriads of angels, 23 to the general assembly and church of the firstborn who are enrolled in heaven, and to God, the Judge of all, and to the spirits of the righteous made perfect, 24 and to Jesus, the mediator of a new covenant, and to the sprinkled blood, which speaks better than the blood of Abel.

Romans 1:25

For they exchanged the truth of God for a lie, and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator, who is blessed forever. Amen.

 


Book Cover For 'Church Of Rome At The Bar Of History'

Most Christians know that Catholics venerate Mary but most of us probably don’t realize how far Catholic teaching goes about her. It goes way beyond affirming that she was conceived without sin (The Immaculate Conception) and taken up into Heaven (The Assumption). The following quote reveals some of the Catholic inventions about her and the resulting shift of love and glory from the Lord Jesus Christ to her – from the Creator to the creature. I pray that, if you’re a Catholic, this gives you insight. William Webster wrote:

“Scripture asserts quite plainly that ‘there is one God, and one mediator also between God and men, the man Christ Jesus’ (1 Tim. 2:5). Yet the Roman Church changes this. While it agrees that Christ is the ultimate mediator, Rome teaches that Mary has been assigned the role by God of co-operating with the Lord Jesus Christ in the mediation of grace. It is argued that just as Christians pray to God on behalf of one another and in this sense can be called mediators, so Mary acts as a mediatrix or mediatress for Christians still on earth. She intercedes on their behalf before God.

“The argument sounds innocent enough. After all, Christians do pray to God for one another. But there is a fallacy in this proposed defense. In praying to God on behalf of other individuals, the Christians is not a mediator. Of course, we intercede for others with God – but when Scripture speaks of Jesus as mediator, it stresses that He alone is the mediator who can reconcile God and man. It is through Christ and Him alone that God mediates His saving grace to mankind. It is through Christ alone that men and women are granted access into the presence of God. When Christians pray for other men and women, they go directly to God through Jesus Christ and offer their intercession. In no way are they acting as mediators who can mediate grace to other men. If someone asks me to pray for them they do not look to me as a channel of grace which they can depend upon to meet their spiritual need. 

“To pray for someone is one thing, to be a mediator in the biblical sense is quite another. The one is sanctioned in Scripture, the other is strictly forbidden – for there is only one mediator, the Lord Jesus Christ. The position that the Roman Church assigns to Mary far accedes the simple and innocent illustration of someone who prays for someone else. In its theology, she is a mediatrix with all the powers and prerogatives which are given to Jesus Christ in Scripture. She is placed on a par, equal in dignity, honor and function with the Lord of glory. Mary is a channel of grace to men; God has ordained that all the grace that Christ has won should be mediated through Mary. Roman Catholic apologist Karl Keating is explicit on this point: ‘No grace accrues to us without her intercession. . .Through God’s will, grace is not conferred on anyone without Mary’s co-operation.‘ (19) [emphasis added]

“And not only is it taught that she is a mediatrix in the sense that she is God’s ordained channel of grace to men, but she is also a co-redemptrix in the sense that she also co-operated with the Lord Jesus Christ in making atonement for sin. This is validated from the teaching of a number of popes. For example: Pope Leo VIII. . .Pius XI. . .Benedict XV. . .Pius IX. . .

“According to papal authority Mary co-operates with Christ in redemption by personal merit, satisfaction, sacrifice and in offering a personal ransom price and she is now the one authorized to dispense the grace of salvation to men.”

The Church of Rome At The Bar Of History, William Webster, The Banner Of Truth Trust, last reprint 2003. pp. 85-87. 

(19) Karl Keating, Catholicism and Fundamentalism (San Francisco: Ignatius, 1988), p. 279.


 

13 thoughts on “Mary of Nazareth, who is she really? A few thoughts, part 2

  1. In Mediterranean cultures, if you want something from a man, your most powerful advocate is his mother. I can see how the mediatrix false doctrine developed. You are absolutely right–our prayers go straight to Jesus and through Jesus to his Father. We neither need nor want the help of his mother. J.

    Liked by 2 people

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