The Shack – what do we do with this book and movie?


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Yesterday IB of See, there’s this thing called biology… ~  wrote about the need to be compassionate when we react to hurting people who say they’ve been helped by The Shack. It’s a truly good thing to be careful how we respond to others, especially those who are suffering, but there is more at stake here because we’re commanded to defend the faith. Compassion and sound doctrine must go hand in hand, and they do. 

Jude

Beloved, while I was very diligent to write to you concerning our common salvation, I found it necessary to write to you exhorting you to contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints. For certain men have crept in unnoticed, who long ago were marked out for this condemnation, ungodly men, who turn the grace of our God into lewdness and deny the only Lord God and our Lord Jesus Christ.

Psalm 85:10 

Mercy and truth have met together;
Righteousness and peace have kissed.

Recently Tom of excatholic4christ posted Weekend Roundup – News & Views – 3/4/17 in which he included this image. Compassion is needed by all of us, truth is essential to us all. Let’s make sure we focus on both!

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shackm

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16 thoughts on “The Shack – what do we do with this book and movie?

  1. Thanks for posting this, Maria. I’ve read reports that “The Shack” has sold 20 million copies to date. Wow! It evidently has touched a chord. I’m hearing that many people love the book and have experienced a deep emotional connection with the story. I don’t doubt that. People have been deeply inspired by works of art down through the ages. If a person loves a work of art, they obviously won’t tolerate criticism of it lightly.

    But what I would like to know is how does a Christian who hopefully holds to the basic doctrines of God’s Word regarding soteriology/salvation, Christology, and the Trinity square those foundational beliefs with the dangerously aberrant theology of “The Shack”? What are they thinking when they encounter the heresies? Do they simply gloss over them? Do they even register? Should those of us who do hold to those foundational truths say nothing in the face of subversive theology? Would a person who loves “The Shack” and maybe doesn’t know too much about doctrine be best served by not hearing about the heretical content of the book/film?

    This whole “Shack” controversy is just one example of what’s happening on a larger scale within the church. Emotion and ecumenical tolerance are taking precedence over Biblical truth. Saying anything critical about an ecumenical treatise like “The Shack,” that portrays God in accordance with man’s concepts instead of Scriptural truth, is bound to raise the ire of many of today’s freewheeling evangelicals.

    I hope some of the people who love this book would be willing to reference the articles by Tim Challies, Al Mohler, and others regarding the heretical views espoused by “The Shack.”

    Liked by 2 people

    • Tom, in the final analysis we all like sheep have gone astray. You wrote, “If a person loves a work of art, they obviously won’t tolerate criticism of it lightly.” This is true. This is why so many Christians fight for fiction writers they like and claim that they are truly Christian when the facts show these favorite writers aren’t. They don’t want their love for works of art to be taken from them. And then too, as sheep we sometimes go where we like and feed on weeds instead of sweet grass. Men who preach and write have a huge responsibility before the Lord.

      In answer to your question, people can’t be better off in ignorance of these things. Also, you know most people haven’t studied deeply – they’ve repented and are loved by the Lord and love Him, but are babies.

      It is sad to think that a Christian would go to be fed and comforted where there is darkness. So very sad!!

      Liked by 2 people

  2. This movie, and all like it, fascinate me for the reason you mentioned here.

    People can say, and truly believe, they have been helped by movies like this. But if they have only been helped because it makes them feel better but have not been saved by the Gospel, they have not truly been helped at all and may have, in all actuality, been hurt.

    Above all, grace is important in conversations about these movies, that we cannot forget.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. If we look at John 8:11, Jesus did not condemn the woman caught in adultery but He said these exact words to her, “Go now and leave your life of sin.” Sin was addressed and Jesus did not have to tell her about the specific sin because she got to that place of condemnation by way adultery.

    Sin has to be addressed because that is the very reason Jesus came, to cleanse us from what separates us from God, and if people think God will accept them as they are without the need for repentance, they will be in for a rude awakening.

    I made a post entitled Sin & Compassion if you care to check it out https://modconspiracy.wordpress.com/2017/02/15/sin-and-compassion/

    Liked by 2 people

    • Caeli, you are right – “Sin has to be addressed because that is the very reason Jesus came, to cleanse us from what separates us from God, and if people think God will accept them as they are without the need for repentance, they will be in for a rude awakening.” So then, this being true, we love people by telling them. Thank you for your thoughtful comment!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes. If you look at it, most of the time, the probability of us being rejected and shunned is higher than being received. It’s not for our benefit. It’s not logical for one to purposely bask in outright rejection especially thinking about what the prophets of old had to go through. We don’t necessarily slap on the title of prophets but merely people who obey the Holy Spirit’s leading.

        Liked by 1 person

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