The Athanasian Creed Affirmed in Reformed Confessions


The Reformation reaffirmed the fundamental and essential Bible doctrine of the Holy Trinity, by reaffirming ancient creeds, particularly The Athanasian Creed.

Praise the Lord for the confessions and declarations of faith published during that important time!

Covenanter Reformation

This list was compiled from Reformed Confessions of the 16th and 17th Centuries in English Translation by James T. Dennison, Jr.

Zwingli, Fidei Ratio (1530):

“First of all, I both believe and know that God is one and He alone is God, and that He is by nature good, true, powerful, just, wise, the Creator and Preserver of all things, visible and invisible; that Father, Son and Holy Spirit are indeed three persons, but that their essence is one and single. And I think altogether in accordance with the Creed, the Nicene and also the Athanasian, in all their details concerning the Godhead himself, the names or the three persons.”

The Bohemian Confession (1535):

“First of all, they teach by the Scriptures that God is to be known by faith as One in divine substance, but three in persons, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. They teach that…

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4 thoughts on “The Athanasian Creed Affirmed in Reformed Confessions

  1. A tradition where I am from is to speak the Athanasian Creed once a year on Trinity Sunday (the first Sunday after Pentecost). I have always liked the Creed–it states the mystery of the Trinity very clearly. J.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It is amazing history, Pastor Jim, isn’t it? The Spirit of God led these men to fight the battles of their day – to prove that the Lord Jesus Christ is co-eternal with the Father and the Spirit. It seems like we fight some of the same battles, both for the Divine nature of Jesus Christ and for the Trinitarian nature of the Lord God Almighty today.

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