Should we pray in civil settings with those who don’t believe?


Both the opening and closing of last night’s events are a good argument for doing away with public, shared prayers in such, common, secular events. It’s not that delegates to political conventions should not pray. They should. It’s not that candidates should not pray. They should. It’s not that voters should not pray. They should. The question is not whether but when?

Dr. R. Scott Clark

The Heidelblog

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Of Conventions, Prayers, And Church

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2 thoughts on “Should we pray in civil settings with those who don’t believe?

  1. Thanks, Maria. Yes, group prayer at secular events, prayer in public schools, addressing “God” in the pledge of allegiance, printing “God” on money, etc. were all manifestations of the “Christian nation” mindset that was erroneous. As the nation becomes more and more secular and religiously diverse, this concept of America as a “Christian nation” becomes increasingly untenable.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Tom, you’re right that it is becoming more untenable. We behave as if all ‘men of good will’ believe no matter what they believe. So far we’ve witnessed among others a Sikh, a Muslim, and a Mormon (it was hard to tell he wasn’t a Christian from his language) giving the opening prayer or benediction. Folly as you know and blasphemy.

      Liked by 1 person

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